Skip to main content

Comics & Research: Graphic Medicine

One of the things that sparked off the idea to start offering a session on "Communicating your research as a comic strip" was the rising interest in medical-related comics and public engagement. This area has come to be known as graphic medicine.

Graphic medicine refers to comics and graphic novels that feature illness, and also how comics could be used in healthcare generally.

Examples include:


Billy, Me & You: A memoir of grief and recovery by Nicola Streeten

A reflection on losing a child from the point of view of a 'recovered' mother and how the world reacted to her grief.

'Highly Commended' in the Popular Medicine category of the BMJ Book Awards.









Science Tales: Lies, Hoaxes & Scams by Darryl Cunningham

A look at some of the myths and misunderstandings surrounding science.

Includes the strip The Facts in the Case of Dr. Andrew Wakefield, which examines the MMR vaccine scandal that has contibuted to the current outbreak of measles in the UK.

The Facts in the Case of Dr. Andrew Wakefield can also be read online.

Darryl has also published Psychiatric Tales focusing on different psychiatric disorders and drawing on his experience of working in care homes.


Parasites by Jamie Hall and Edward Ross

The Wellcome Trust Centre for Molecular Parasitology used some of their public engagement fund to create a comic about parasites.

You can download a PDF of the comic.






This is just a very small flavour of the comics out there about medicine and science. You can find lots more examples and reviews on the Graphic Medicine site.

The 4th Annual Graphic Medicine Conference is being held in Brighton in July.

Science writing competitions are also starting to open their doors to comic strip submissions e.g. EuroStemCell Non-Fiction Writing Competition.

The next workshop on 'Communicating your research as a comic strip' will run on 29th May. Full details can be found on PROSE and booking is essential.






Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Inserting special characters in EndNote/RefWorks


When importing references into software like EndNote or RefWorks you might find special characters and diacritical marks are stripped out.

You can edit the reference in the software and re-insert the appropriate character in several ways:
1) Copy and past the character in.

2) If you using a Windows computer with a number pad you can hold down the ALT key and type in a numerical code for the character you want e.g. ALT 130 will insert é.

There is a list of Alt Codes available at http://www.alt-codes.net/

Penn State University has an excellent guide to typing in accents and special characters in Windows or Macs. Including Alt codes, Mac codes and how to use the character map/viewer.

These tips can also be applied in other software and web interfaces, as well as in bibliographic software. ☺ = ALT 1

Inserting Citations & References into PowerPoint with EndNote

EndNote X7, which is available on University computers, now has a toolbar for inserting citations and references into PowerPoint.


1)    Open up PowerPoint and place your cursor where you wish to insert a citation or a reference.
2)    Click on the EndNote X7 tab.
3)    Choose the reference style you want to use from the drop-down menu.
4)    Click Insert Citation or Insert Reference
5)    Search for the reference you want or search on * to bring up a list of all your references.
6)    Click on Insert.

You will need to insert the citation and the references separately as this is not a Cite While You Write toolbar like the one in Word.






















Your New Doctoral College Reading Room

The Doctoral College Reading Room, at the front of the first floor of the library, is now designed for use by PGR students and staff only.

The space includes a separate Silent Study area with desks and computers, a quiet area with desks and informal seating, and a bookable group study room.

We would encourage PGR students and staff to make full use of this space.

Masters students now have a separate Graduate Reading Room elsewhere on the first floor.

As part of the new arrangements there is now a Consultation Room, which we are also using for upcoming events, including Shut Up & Write! and Research Data Drop-in Clinics.

*****

*****