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Research Elevenses & Thesis Forum Recordings

The Research Elevenses sessions are now all available to watch online.

Distinguish yourself: Associate your research with you

ORCID is your free unique researcher identifier for life.  It allows you to unambiguously associate yourself with your research. Otherwise it can be difficult to know exactly who wrote a paper because many people have similar or identical names. ORCID is independent of any employer, funder or commercial concern. We will look at the benefits of ORCID and how simple it is to set up and maintain.
Watch the recording

Unlocking REF2014: Text mining to show your impact

The Library is building a searchable full text database of the papers submitted by Leicester for REF2014.  It has already been used to help support a business case for a piece of equipment, but there may be many other applications.  This session explains how you can undertake your own text mining projects using EndNote and how the Library can help with larger-scale projects using specialist software.
Watch the recording.

Making an (online) exhibition of yourself with Omeka.net

Omeka.net is a web-publishing platform that allows anyone with an account to build digital exhibitions and online collections of photographs, audio, film and textual content. Researchers can publish digital essays, share primary source collections, and collaborate with others in the creation of digital scholarship. No technical knowledge is required, and it’s a simple and cost-effective way of presenting your research online. This session will provide a quick introduction using examples from Leicester and elsewhere.
Watch the recording

Measure the wider impact of your research

Non-traditional metrics (alt-metrics) have become widely available in recent years to help you understand the wider impact of your work.  These complement rather than replace traditional citations and measure very different things.  This session will explore some of the metrics available: including article-level downloads, social media mentions, social bookmarking counts and recommendations.  What do they mean, and how can you access them to follow the progress of your papers?
Watch the recording

Thesis Forum

Going beyond your Doctoral Studies: Running conferences & journals
Ryan Nutting (Museum Studies), Karen Stephens (Education), Dr William Farrell (Library) & Dr Chantal Bielmann (LLI) shared their experiences and advice for running conferences and being involved with PhD-led journals.
Watch the recording

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Inserting special characters in EndNote/RefWorks


When importing references into software like EndNote or RefWorks you might find special characters and diacritical marks are stripped out.

You can edit the reference in the software and re-insert the appropriate character in several ways:
1) Copy and past the character in.

2) If you using a Windows computer with a number pad you can hold down the ALT key and type in a numerical code for the character you want e.g. ALT 130 will insert é.

There is a list of Alt Codes available at http://www.alt-codes.net/

Penn State University has an excellent guide to typing in accents and special characters in Windows or Macs. Including Alt codes, Mac codes and how to use the character map/viewer.

These tips can also be applied in other software and web interfaces, as well as in bibliographic software. ☺ = ALT 1

Inserting Citations & References into PowerPoint with EndNote

EndNote X7, which is available on University computers, now has a toolbar for inserting citations and references into PowerPoint.


1)    Open up PowerPoint and place your cursor where you wish to insert a citation or a reference.
2)    Click on the EndNote X7 tab.
3)    Choose the reference style you want to use from the drop-down menu.
4)    Click Insert Citation or Insert Reference
5)    Search for the reference you want or search on * to bring up a list of all your references.
6)    Click on Insert.

You will need to insert the citation and the references separately as this is not a Cite While You Write toolbar like the one in Word.






















Your New Doctoral College Reading Room

The Doctoral College Reading Room, at the front of the first floor of the library, is now designed for use by PGR students and staff only.

The space includes a separate Silent Study area with desks and computers, a quiet area with desks and informal seating, and a bookable group study room.

We would encourage PGR students and staff to make full use of this space.

Masters students now have a separate Graduate Reading Room elsewhere on the first floor.

As part of the new arrangements there is now a Consultation Room, which we are also using for upcoming events, including Shut Up & Write! and Research Data Drop-in Clinics.

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