Pages

Monday, 8 March 2010

Networking and the blog


New research shows that networking is the most effective way to communicate innovative research, so why not consider the blog as a networking tool? Last Thursday a GSMZ workshop looked at the potential of blogs not only for tracking and publicising research but for keeping in touch with a community of bloggers and readers interested in the same thing, whether it be a specific research topic or the process of researching in itself. Have a look at some of these blogs by students and academics to see how the blog can communicate ideas whether it's used as a solitary pursuit or a team effort.

Postgraduate student blogging communities at Leicester

http://attic-museumstudies.blogspot.com/
http://www.newhistorylab.org/

PhD blogs
http://malenel.wordpress.com/
http://www.prospects.ac.uk/p/articles/phd_blog_43.jsp

Blogs by academics at Leicester
http://www.microbiologybytes.com/blog/

…and elsewhere
http://mat.gsia.cmu.edu/blog/
http://timesonline.typepad.com/dons_life/

2 comments:

  1. What do you do when your discipline doesn't really understand blogging and thinks it's not really of any use?

    As an example, see this anthropology journal article:
    http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/123301409/PDFSTART?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0

    And some bloggers responses:
    http://ancientworldbloggers.blogspot.com/2010/02/blogs-dont-get-no-respect.html
    http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/03/metablogging-monday.html

    ReplyDelete
  2. That's quite common! I think blogs will become more accepted as time goes on, especially as blogs like ancientworldbloggers form communities that grow and gain respect within their disciplines.

    ReplyDelete