Skip to main content

21st century reading habits


I've had my kindle for nearly a year now, and during that time it's been amazing to see how reading habits have changed in general. E-readers now seem to be the norm on public trainsport and in waiting rooms across the country, and they're increasingly being used in educational contexts. E-readers are now considered a requirement for some university courses, and many students report that they prefer e-ink or pixels to paper (read more on this).

I'm finding that my preferences are also shifting. I've been known to wish that I could increase the font size or improve the contrast on a paperback. I'm used to having everything I might want to read over the course of a long journey - from the newspaper, to journal articles, poetry and novels - on one small, light device, when I would have needed a suitcase to have that amount of choice before. Walking to the shop or the library now seems like a fairly difficult way of getting my hands on a book when I can download one in under a minute!

Despite the convenience of digital reading devices, I'm still not completely converted. A book is a pleasing object. It is also a shared object. I like the freedom to lend books I have enjoyed to friends and family. So in some ways e-readers, even though some allow you to tweet passages or post favourite lines on facebook, make reading more of a solitary than a social pursuit. When I can share the books I've bought I'll be more interested in buying a book on a device.
Like all digital habits, I think that reading habits in the 21st century will continue to be flexible and changeable. Have your reading habits changed?
Find out how you can try out an e-reader in the Library.

Comments

  1. I agree with you! I'm not 100% converted to mine either! Though I love it for my children. They have been obsessed with Lazytown Digital Books. I approve because it keeps them reading.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Inserting special characters in EndNote/RefWorks


When importing references into software like EndNote or RefWorks you might find special characters and diacritical marks are stripped out.

You can edit the reference in the software and re-insert the appropriate character in several ways:
1) Copy and past the character in.

2) If you using a Windows computer with a number pad you can hold down the ALT key and type in a numerical code for the character you want e.g. ALT 130 will insert é.

There is a list of Alt Codes available at http://www.alt-codes.net/

Penn State University has an excellent guide to typing in accents and special characters in Windows or Macs. Including Alt codes, Mac codes and how to use the character map/viewer.

These tips can also be applied in other software and web interfaces, as well as in bibliographic software. ☺ = ALT 1

Inserting Citations & References into PowerPoint with EndNote

EndNote X7, which is available on University computers, now has a toolbar for inserting citations and references into PowerPoint.


1)    Open up PowerPoint and place your cursor where you wish to insert a citation or a reference.
2)    Click on the EndNote X7 tab.
3)    Choose the reference style you want to use from the drop-down menu.
4)    Click Insert Citation or Insert Reference
5)    Search for the reference you want or search on * to bring up a list of all your references.
6)    Click on Insert.

You will need to insert the citation and the references separately as this is not a Cite While You Write toolbar like the one in Word.






















Your New Doctoral College Reading Room

The Doctoral College Reading Room, at the front of the first floor of the library, is now designed for use by PGR students and staff only.

The space includes a separate Silent Study area with desks and computers, a quiet area with desks and informal seating, and a bookable group study room.

We would encourage PGR students and staff to make full use of this space.

Masters students now have a separate Graduate Reading Room elsewhere on the first floor.

As part of the new arrangements there is now a Consultation Room, which we are also using for upcoming events, including Shut Up & Write! and Research Data Drop-in Clinics.

*****

*****