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Latest Journal Impact Factors (2016) now available

What is a Journal Impact Factor?

An impact factor is a measurement looking at the average number of citations articles in a particular journal receives. 

It is calculated by:

The number of times that all items published in a journal in the previous two years (e.g. 2014 & 2015) were cited by indexed publications during the year of interest (e.g. 2016)

divided by

The total number of "citable items" published by that journal in those two years (e.g. 2014 & 2015)

Finding a Journal Impact Factor



Remember - not all journals are indexed by the Journal Citation Reports, so not all journals have an impact factor.
  • You will then see the Journal Profile, which includes the Impact Factor:

 Find the highest impact journal in your area

  • Click on Journals By Rank
  • Click 'Select Category' and select the subject area closet to your own:
  • Click Submit at the bottom of the screen.
  • Scroll down to see the journals within the category, ranked by impact factor:


Responsible use of journal impact factors:

The University of Leicester has signed the The San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), which includes the following advice for researchers:

- When involved in committees making decisions about funding, hiring, tenure, or promotion, make assessments based on scientific content rather than publication metrics.

- Wherever appropriate, cite primary literature in which observations are first reported rather than reviews in order to give credit where credit is due.

- Use a range of article metrics and indicators on personal/supporting statements, as evidence of the impact of individual published articles and other research outputs.


- Challenge research assessment practices that rely inappropriately on Journal Impact Factors and promote and teach best practice that focuses on the value and influence of specific research outputs.


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