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Watching on the web?

According to Cisco, by 2015 most internet traffic will be video. Here's a breakdown of what the internet might look like by then.
But you don't have to wait until 2015 to find loads of video resources that support research and academic activities - the web is already full of information and advice caught on camera. YouTube is increasingly the go-to place for searches on any topic, and online videos and webinars are rapidly taking the place of events that require attendance in person. For the cash-strapped researcher, this is all good news. Face to face interaction might be your ideal, but the increasing volume of video on the web allows researchers to attend lectures and workshops from home, saving on time and money. So how can you use online videos to develop your writing, your time management and your career?

Want to beat writer's block, or write your thesis in record time? The Three Month Thesis videos have the answer, as well as some great suggestions for time management skills.

If you're more interested in what to do when the writing's over, have a look at the videos about academic careers on the Manchester Academic Career website, or get the advice of careers advisers and skills developers with the Beyond the PhD videos.

For finding out about social media and some clear and concise 'how-to' videos, Commoncraft's plain english videos are a useful introduction to a wide range of topics.
Video tutorials are often available as an alternative to written introductions or guides to online tools. Have a look at some popular examples such as Dropbox,Scrivener and Evernote.

On the University of Leicester's Youtube channel you can watch videos on topics from How to Record an Oral History Interview to Making an Agarose Gel.

I use online videos for watching my favourite poet read from his study thousands of miles away, lectures on iTunes U, and TED talks on almost everything.

Happy watching!

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